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English

ENGL 2101 - Technical Communication - Summer15


Class
Lorie Mattox
Enrollment for this class is currently closed.

About

ENG 2101 integrates several learning goals in order to create a dynamic environment in technical writing with direct application to real-world communication for a specific audience, purpose, and context. Students will be self-directed writers who make use of resources, writing, grammar, case studies, research, and design as they develop critical thinking skills that sharpen their abilities as they master technical writing forms.
Prerequisite: Engl 1101
CSP 1,6,7

2015 ENGL 2101 Syllabus.docx

INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF GRAND-BASSAM

School of Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

Course ENGL2101 – Technical Communication

Tuesday and Thursday at 10:00 A.M. to 12:50 A.M. in R20

Syllabus for Summer Semester 2015

 

Instructor Information:

  1. Name: Ms. Lorie Mattox
  2. Email: mattox.l@iugb.edu.ci
  3. Office location: Room 121 in Administrative Building
  4. Office hours: 9:00am-11:00am MWF & 2:00pm-4:00pm TT

 

Course information

  1. Number of Class Hours per week: 6
  2. Number of Credits: 3
  3. Articulation: GSU/UH/UAB: Yes
  4. Course Prerequisites: ENGL1
  5. Computer Skills Prerequisites (CSP): 1, 6, 7
  6. Course Description: ENGL 2101 integrates several learning goals in order to create a dynamic environment in technical writing with direct application to real-world communication for a specific audience, purpose, and context. Students will be self-directed writers who make use of resources, writing, grammar, case studies, research, and design as they develop critical thinking skills that sharpen their abilities as they master technical writing forms.
  7. Turnitin details: Class Id: 9843722; Enrollment password: joinme

 

Position of the Course in the University Curriculum:

  1. Level: Pre-University / Undergraduate
  2. Core Curriculum Group(s): required
  3. Required for majors: All

 

Institutional Learning Outcomes supported by the Course:

☒ Communication (Oral and Written)

☒ Collaboration

☒ Critical Thinking

☒ Contemporary Issues

☐ Quantitative Skills

☒ Technology

☒ Problem Solving

 

Instructional Goals Alignment: School, subject area and individual course goals

This course meets the STEM School goals as well as the guidelines from the International Code Council: http://www.iccsafe.org/iccforums/Pages/default.aspx

 

Learning Objectives: At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1. Recognize that all writing is contextual and to demonstrate technical writing skills through invention, organization, drafting, revision, editing, and presentation.
  2.  Evaluate and use the shared conventions, practices, standards, and constructs of business and technical writing forms.
  3. Associate and express through writing the issues and purposes of specific technical fields.
  4. Interpret and apply basic principles of critical thinking, problem solving, and technical proficiency through written exposition and argument.
  5. Develop the ability to research and compose a documented proposal that conforms to the standards of the discipline and to formulate an identity in a particular discipline or profession.

 

Required Texts

Lannon, J.M. & Gurak, J.L. (2015). Technical Communication (13th ed.). Essex, England: Pearson Education Ltd.

Lundsford, Andrea A. (2010). The Everyday Writer (4th ed.). Boston, MA: Bedford/St. Martin’s.

 

Additional References / Bibliography

Anderson, Paul V. (2014). Technical Communication. Boston, MA: Cengage Textbook. Kindle Edition.

Gerson, Steven M. Writing that Works: A Teacher’s Guide to Technical Writing. Topeka, KS: Kansas Curriculum Center, Washburn University.

 

Course Outline

Wk

Reading:

read before class

Topic

Assignments:

submit by midnight Saturday

1

5/12

Chpt. 1 & 2

Introduction

 

·       Discussion 1

·       E-portfolio

2

5/19 & 21

Chpt. 3 & 17

Communicating with Persuasion

 

·       Discussion 2

·       Professional Identity

3

5/26 & 28

Chpt. 10 & 12

Organizing for Readers

·       Discussion 3

·       Visualize Data

4

6/2

& 4

Chpt. 11 & 13

Purpose, Process and Product

Midterm

·       Discussion 4

·       Inform

5

6/9

& 11

Chpt. 14, 15 & 16

Critical Thinking

Group Project

·       Discussion 5

·       Technical Information

6

6/16 & 18

Chpt. 22 & 7

Identifying the Problem

 

·       Discussion 6

·       Solve a Problem

7

6/23 & 25

Chpt. 8, 9 &

Appendix A

Information Literacy

Group Project

·       Discussion 7

·       Group Project Memo

 

8

6/30

7/2

 

Group Project presentations

Final

·       Group Project presentation

·       E-portfolios

 

Methodology Used

Class sessions will include but not be limited to the following:

  1. Lecture – Presentation of new material – Students will prepare by reading the appropriate reading assignments.
  2. Hands-on experience with technology hardware and software – Students will:
    1. Integrate and apply content learning in actual classroom projects
    2. Demonstrate ownership of learned concepts by practicing newly learned skills through digitalized homework assignment (website: www.iugb.edu20.org)
  3. Group discussions – Each student will:
    1. Participate in class discussions on the class website. Students will show higher level thinking in reflective responses made to fellow peers and instructor.
    2. Students will develop their professional research and reading skills as they are requested to research professional journals and databases to prepare and present their research as well as reflect on their readings.
  4. Group projects and case studies – Groups of students will work in project teams to tackle a specific, real-world problem using technical communication techniques. Use APA style for word-processed documents and bibliographies.

 

Assessments and Project Description

  1. Weighting of different assessments
    1. Total = 100%
      1. Discussions (in class and online) 10%
      2. Quizzes (one a week) 10%
      3. Individual Project(s) 15%
      4. Group Project(s) 15%
      5. Midterm & Final 25%
      6. E-portfolios 25%

 

IUGB Grading Scale

 

Letter Grade

Credit

Quality

Grading Scale

 

 

Points

(In Percentage)

A+

Yes

4.30

97-100

A

Yes

4.00

93-96

A-

Yes

3.70

90-92

B+

Yes

3.30

87-89

B

Yes

3.00

83-86

B-

Yes

2.70

80-82

C+

Yes

2.30

77-79

C

Yes

2.00

73-76

C-

Yes

1.70

70-72

D

Yes

1.00

59.5-69

F

NO

0.00

<59.5

K

YES

0.00

Credit by Exam Pass/Fail

V

NO

0.00

Audit

W

NO

0.00

Withdrawal

WF

NO

0.00

Failing withdrawal

I

NO

0.00

Must be made up before the next semester begins

 

XII.     General Policies

 

The instructor reserves the right to modify the outline and/or the assignments as deemed necessary to meet certain needs or situations that will arise during the semester.

 

 

IUGB policies and academic integrity

All student IUGB general policies, computer lab use policies, and plagiarism policies will be enforced during this course. No credit will be given to work that does not honor academic integrity. Regarding instances of plagiarism, the first instance will result in a zero for the assignment with an opportunity to resubmit. The second instance will result in a zero for the assignment, no opportunity to resubmit, loss of the opportunity to present a digital portfolio, and a report to the Dean and advisors. The third instance will result in an F for the course.

 

IUGB attendance policies

Attendance is NOT optional. Students are expected to attend each class meeting and be on time. Students who have unexcused absences for more than 20% of course meetings will fail the course. Students may be marked absent if they are ten minutes late, create a disruption, leave class without permission, leave class early or for extended periods of time, or take part in forbidden classroom behavior (such as texting, instant messaging, accessing websites unrelated to class work).

 

Make-up policy

Late work is not permitted. If the assignment is not turned in on time, or if arrangements for missed work during absences are not made up within 24 hours of the student's return to the class, the grade for the missed work is zero.

 

Students with Special Needs or Disabilities

Please let the instructor know if you have any special needs and need specific accommodations.

 

Classroom conduct

Respect of instructors and fellow students is very important.

 

Use of technology is strictly prohibited during class unless it is being used legitimately for a class assignment. No text messaging during class! Phones should be turned OFF during the class period. Improper use of electronic devices will lower your class participation grade or cause you to be marked absent.

 

Students who are dressed in a distracting manner will be asked to leave class and be marked absent.

 

XIII.    FACULTY BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Ms. Lorie Mattox

May 2013             MAEd/ESL, UAB, Birmingham, AL, USA

December 2002     MA in Theology, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Ft. Worth, TX, USA

December 1994     BA in English, specializing in Technical Writing, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA

 

 

APPENDIX: COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 

  1. Discussions
  2. Quizzes
  3. Individual/Pair Projects
    1. Writing to Present a Professional Identity
    2. Writing to Visualize Data (in pairs)
    3. Writing to Inform (in pairs)
    4. Writing to Define and Describe Technical Information
    5. Writing to Solve a Problem
  4. Group Project
  5. Projects’ Rubric
  6. Midterm & Final
  7. E-portfolio

 

APPENDIX A: DISCUSSIONS

 

Students will complete several one to two hundred-word discussion board Edu assignments on the subject of business and personal ethics. In these assignments, students will show their ability to apply knowledge, debate issues and ideas, and provide a rationale for the positions they take on complex ethical topics. Students are evaluated on their ability to support their positions and to converse intelligently with those who disagree with them.

 

Students are to post one personal response to each discussion question and at least one response to a peer’s reflection. The first response should be substantial and follow APA style. You will need to be critically reflective. The response to your peers should further the discussion and go beyond the ‘I agree’ level.

 

 

APPENDIX B: QUIZZES

 

Weekly reading quizzes will be administered in class and will assess the student’s understanding of readings. They will be administered on the second day of class each week.

 

 

APPENDIX C: INDIVIDUAL/PAIR PROJECTS

 

  1. Writing to Present a Professional Identity – May 23

For this project, students will compose a letter of application, a resume, a thank you letter, a job acceptance letter and a letter declining an offer that target a specific audience. The job acceptance letter my use pretend start dates, salary or benefit amounts, etc. Spelling or typographical errors are not acceptable or tolerated when applying for a job. Take extra care and consideration when creating these documents.

Deliverables (Word docs):

  1. Letter of application – about 1 page, typed, single-spaced with 12 pt. font
  2. Resume – 1 page
  3. Interview “thank you” letter – about 1 page, typed, single-spaced with 12 pt. font
  4. Job acceptance letter – about 1 page, typed, single-spaced with 12 pt. font
  5. Letter declining an offer – about 1 page, typed, single-spaced with 12 pt. font

 

 

  1. Writing to Visualize Data (pairs) – May 30

In this project, students will build data visualization skills by creating an infographic based on one or more data sets. Infographics combine principles of topography, color theory, design theory, and may include other types of graphics (charts and graphs) to convey complex information clearly and concisely to a non-technical audience. In addition, students will compose a memo that explains the rationale behind your visual design choices.

Deliverables:

  1. Infographic (pdf)
  2. Memo explaining choices (Word doc) – typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font

 

  1. Writing to Inform (brochures completed in pairs) – June 6

For this project, students will collect information to publicize an area of IUGB (UPP program, job clinics, campus clubs, etc). Begin by interviewing people to learn about the aims for such a brochure. In addition to any artwork you may decide to include on the cover, use at least one graphic (such as a table, flowchart, drawing, or photograph) in the text of the brochure. Note that the cover need not have any artwork; it may consist solely of attractively lettered and arranged words that identify the topic of the brochure. Student’s success in this project will depend largely on the ability to predict the questions the readers will have about the subject—and on student’s ability to answer those questions clearly, concisely, and usefully. Remember that along with the prose, the neatness and graphic design of the brochure will have a major effect on the readers’ attitudes. In addition, students will compose a memo that explains the rationale behind your visual design choices, including an audience profile sheet.

Deliverables:

  1. Transcript of interview (Word doc) – typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font
  2. Finished product: (Brochure – pdf) – 1 page, front and back
  3. Memo explaining choices (Word doc) – about 1 page, typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font and about 1 page for audience profile sheet, typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font

 

  1. Writing to Define and Describe Technical Information – June 13

For this project, students will write an extended technical definition, a developed technical description that incorporates visuals and a cover memo that explains the rhetorical choices made in composing each of these technical writing genres. The technical term should come from student’s field of study. All deliverables should total about 3 pages (typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font).

Deliverables:

  1. Memo explaining choices (Word doc) – typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font
  2. An extended technical definition (Word doc submitted on Turnitin.com) – typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font
  3. A developed technical description with visuals (Word doc submitted on Turnitin.com) – typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font

 

  1. Writing to Solve a Problem – June 20

For this project, students will uncover important information that must be conveyed to a boss, colleagues, and clients of a hypothetical workplace. Students will write 3 separate messages that convey the same information, but are adapted for each specific audience. All deliverables should total about 3 pages.

Deliverables:

  1. Memo to boss (Word doc) – typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font
  2. Email to colleagues (Word doc) – typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font
  3. Business letter to clients (Word doc) – typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font

 

 

APPENDIX D: GROUP PROJECTS

 

Integrating the knowledge from the first half of the course, students will work in project teams to tackle a specific, real-world problem using technical communication techniques. A hypothetical company will employ each group. For this company, groups will write a sales letter marketing a product or service, a letter of inquiry from a perspective client (another company) requesting details on how to use the new product or service, a directive memo from the boss and an instructional manual for the product or service. In addition, students will compose a memo that explains the rationale behind your visual design choices, including an audience profile sheet. Last, the group will create a presentation for the client (the class) to demonstrate the instructional memo.

Deliverables:

  1. Sales Letter June 9 (Word doc)typed, single-spaced with 12 pt. font
  2. Letter of Inquiry June 9 (Word doc)typed, single-spaced with 12 pt. font
  3. Directive Memo June 9 (Word doc)typed, single-spaced with 12 pt. font
  4. Instructional Manual June 23 (Word doc or pdf) – students’ choice
  5. Presentation of Instructional Manual to Client June 30 – PowerPoint Presentation
  6. Memo explaining choices June 27 (Word doc) – about 1 page, typed, double-spaced with 12 pt. font and about 1 page for audience profile sheet, typed, single-spaced with 12 pt. font

 

 

APPENDIX E: PROJECTS’ RUBRIC

 

Students can achieve the best grade for individual/pair and group projects by following the standards in the table below. It is in the student’s best interests to check his or her work against these recommendations before turning work in for grading.

 

Trait

0 a   a  2   a a 6

7 a a 10 aa 12

13 a a 10 aa 18

AUDIENCE

·   Failure to match audience needs

·   Unethical aspects

·   Some mismatches of document to audience needs

·   An ethical approach to the communication situation

·   Excellent match of document to audience needs

·   An ethical approach to the communication situation

DESIGN

·   Failure to match design elements to document genre

·   Lack of implementation of design principles

·   Problems with typography that defeat usability

·   Lack of required graphics or unethical graphics

·   Adequate match of design elements to document genre

·   Implementation of design principles in most areas

·   A few problems with typography

·   Adequate and ethical use of graphics

·   Excellent match of design elements to document genre

·   Effective use of design principles such as repetition, alignment, contrast, and proximity

·   Excellent and ethical use of graphics

STYLE &

EDITING

·   Unclear and wordy prose throughout

·   Extensive mismatches of level of formality and technicality to audience

·   Significant problems with gender and culture language

·   8 or more grammatical, mechanical, or typographical errors

·   Errors make the document fail in its goals

·   Somewhat unclear or wordy prose

·   Mostly good matching of level of formality and technicality to audience

·   Gender- and culture-appropriate language

·   4-5 grammatical, mechanical, or typographical errors

·   Errors affect usability

·   Clear and succinct prose

·   Excellent matching of level of formality and technicality to audience

·   Gender- and culture-appropriate language

·   No grammatical, mechanical, or typographical errors

·   Errors do not affect usability

STRUCTURE

·   Fails to follow significant structural conventions for this genre

·   Fails to use headings and transitions successfully

·   Arranges parts illogically

·   Does not state the purpose

·   Follows structural conventions for the genre

·   Uses a few unclear headings and transitions

·   Includes a few minor illogical arrangements

·   States the purpose, but not clearly

·   Follows structural conventions

·   Uses clear headings and transitions

·   Arranges parts logically

·   States the purpose clearly

ASSIGNMENT

COMPLETION

·   Does not fulfill the assignment

·   Missing multiple significant parts of the assignment

·   Incomplete or inappropriate citation of sources

·   Fulfills assignment description

·   Missing one or more minor parts of the assignment

·   Incomplete or inappropriate citation of sources

·   Fulfills assignment precisely and fully

·   Includes all parts of the assignment

·   Complete and appropriate citation of sources

 

1 a   a  2   a a 3

4 a a 5 aa 6

7 a a 8 a a 10

ON TIME

(& PEER REVIEWS)

·   Submitted 7 days late

·   Submitted 4 days late

·   Submitted on time or early

 

 

APPENDIX F: MIDTERM & FINAL

 

The midterm and final consists of essay questions (one or two) in which students illustrate a comprehensive knowledge of the fundamentals of technical communication (memos, job application, etc.).

 

 

APPENDIX G: E-PORTFOLIO

 

E-portfolios are electronic folders showcasing a student’s work. They can have many pages and contain a wide variety of information. Also it is an effective tool for students to self-monitor their progress over the semester. Eventually academic e-portfolios can become a collection of projects that potential employers can review when students begin applying for jobs. Interested employers from all over the world can view student’s work and use that information to determine if a student meets their company’s needs.

 

In this course, student will create a professional e-portfolio though Google Sites. Students need to include the following final draft items in their e-portfolio (all documents in the e-portfolio need to be saved in PDF format and submitted by July 4):

  1. Writing to Present a Professional Identity
  2. Writing to Visualize Data
  3. Writing to Inform
  4. Writing to Solve a Problem
  5. Writing to Define and Describe Technical Information
  6. Group Project:
    1. Sales Letter
    2. Letter of Inquiry
    3. Directive Memo
    4. Instructional Manual
    5. PP Presentation
    6. Presentation of Project Plan and Claim Letter video or PPP
  7. 4 Complete Discussion threads (student’s original comment and all following classmates comments.
  8. Reflection Paper: At the end of this course, students are to write a reflection paper. This reflection paper should be composed of six paragraphs, one for each of the following questions. Use these questions as subtitles before each of the corresponding paragraphs.
    1. What have you included in the portfolio that involved the most critical thinking and/or is your most original work? What makes it the best piece?
    2. Which item would you revise or redo if you were given the time? Why?
    3. Explain how this course has changed your way of thinking about technical communication.
    4. Reflect on how your way of thinking has evolved with respect to the variety of items that constitute technical communication.
    5. Describe any goals that you have derived from this course that might affect your career.
    6. What suggestions do you have for improving this course?

 

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